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  • About UsThese pictures are here to assist anyone who would like to view some of the 550+ photos, taken on my solo Bibbulmun Track North to South - End to End trek, that took 51 days including 4 rest days - starting 3rd September 2007 and finishing on 23rd Ocober 2007. The journey was profound in so many ways!
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  • If you spot some errors , or have a comment, please contact:
  • stevep@westcoastassist.com.au - type re Bib Track in the "subject heading" of the email - thanks
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Looking back to the roof of my last hut. A blurred shot, but it shows the isolation of the hut.
  • Looking back to the roof of my last hut. A blurred shot, but it shows the isolation of the hut.
    Looking back to the roof of my last hut (centre of picture), I noticed a road to the left that I had been unaware of. A blurred shot, but it shows the isolation of the hut.
  • I stuck my walking pole in this photo to show how deep and soft the dand was that I had just come through.
    I stuck my walking pole in this photo to show how deep and soft the sand was that I had just come through. Tough going down this part of the Track.
  • Even the four wheel drive club rate these hills, by putting down rubber matting tracks, so they don't destroy the dunes any more.
    Even the four wheel drive club rate these hills, by putting down rubber matting tracks, so they don't destroy the dunes any more. At first I thought it was a bitumen road.
  • Feels like a five lane highway on the beach.
    Feels like a five lane highway on the beach.
  • After climbing over Monkey Rock, I stopped in awe to view HUGE granite boulders
    After climbing over "Monkey Rock", I stopped in awe to view HUGE granite boulders
  • These boulders are right besdie the Track but don't look so impressive from afar or looking back.
    These boulders are right beside the Track but don't look so impressive when looking back.
  • Still skirting around puddles like this.
    Still skirting around puddles like this.
  • Idyllic beach locations are often viewed from above. The wave surge almost covers the beach at times, as can be seen by the wet sand.
    Idyllic beach locations are often viewed from above. The wave surge almost covers the beach at times, as can be seen by the wet sand.
  • You have to look down to climb this steep step, and in so doing you cannot miss the sign - or could you?
    You have to look down to climb this steep step, and in so doing you cannot miss the sign - or could you? Still heading in the right direction.
  • Very thoughtful style crossing a private property fence (there were a few the Track crosses).
    Very thoughtful style crossing a private property fence (there were a few the Track crosses). The extended poles lets me hold on something while on the top step. Remember I had a backpack trying to out-balance me.
  • Heavy showers stopped for 10 minutes so this is what the Ocean Beach sandbar blocking the Wilson Inlet at Denmark looks like from a viewing platform.
    Heavy showers stopped for ten minutes so this is what the "Ocean Beach" sandbar blocking the "Wilson Inlet" at "Denmark" looks like from a viewing platform. This is an alternative route mentioned in the book, but the signs were under water, the same as the Track.
  • Do not do what I did - walking along the beach towards Anvil Beach, you can see the cliffs in the distance.
    Do not do what I did - walking along the beach towards "Anvil Beach", you can see the cliffs in the distance. The Track was deeply flooded on the southern side of the Inlet, so I decided to walk along the beach instead. I had to climb crumbling limestone cliffs, which were really quite dangerous, and make my own track though the bush at the top, using my compass for direction. Very silly, as it also cost me around 15kms extra for getting lost yet again!! (the last time). All of this was written-up in the next hut's Journal. Nobody would have found me if something had gone wrong.
  • This notice says it all.
    This notice says it all.
  • For once the Wilson Inlet sandbar was not opened as it usually was. That meant a big backlog of water from all the i, flooding many of the surrounding areas including the Bibbulmun Track.
    For once the "Wilson Inlet" sandbar was not opened as it usually was. That meant a big backlog of water from all the river, flooding many of the surrounding areas including the "Bibbulmun Track". It seemed like a once off opportunity t walk across the inlet. That turned out to be a big mistake, as I refused to turn around when faced with cliffs at Anvil beach.
  • This fence must have cost millions to construct and it's electric too. Is it to keep something in or something out?
    This fence must have cost millions to construct and it's electric too. Is it to keep something in or something out? Destruction of the original "Bibbulmun Track" has been caused by some private fencing. Sometimes I had previously felt like an escapee from a prison farm, or an illegal immigrant in a foreign bush world, but even more so with a fence to walk alongside. They call this progress?
  • The Roo population have put hundreds of dents or bulgee in the mesh. They have been trapped like evey other animal.
    The "Roo" population have put hundreds of dents or bulges in the mesh. They have been trapped like evey other animal. Will this land end up being sold as large blocks of residential bush land like other areas between "Denmark" and "Nullaki" campsite? The bush destruction is horrendous!
  • The fence is like a giant catipillar going up and down hills with ease
    The fence is like a giant catipillar going up and down hills with ease. It seems like I am on the acceptable side.
  • West Howe campsite where these seasoned Trekkers put up a self-supporing tent inside the hut , to give them extra warmth.
    "West Howe" campsite where these seasoned Trekkers put up a self-supporing tent inside the hut , to give them extra warmth. They had packed the wrong fuel for their stove, so I let them share my gas stove and they let me share their meal. A happy swop, as I did not have to do any cooking for once.
  • Finally leaving the dunes behind, I go through a small tree section of the Track. A welcome change.
    Finally leaving the dunes behind, I go through a small tree section of the Track. A welcome change.
  • Quite a beautiful small tree canopy or tunnel.
    Quite a beautiful small tree canopy or tunnel.
  • The Track momentarily turns to rock again. Give me rocks any day than sand.
    The Track momentarily turns to rock again. I only fell once on the total journey but it was on a hard wet clay surface that was not very steep. I lay for a while on my back, considering if I was going to try and get out of the backpack or stand up with it on. Don't do the latter as I almost pulled a muscle in the process.
  • Another trekker that did not make it home! I guess this was really a Roo?
    Another trekker that did not make it home! I guess this was really a dead "Roo"?
  • Looks like I am heading down to the surf. No sand so I am enjoying the change.
    Looks like I am heading down to the surf. No sand so I am enjoying the change.
  • Must be getting near Albany as I recognise the Albany Wolley Bush
    Must be getting near "Albany" as I recognise the "Albany Wolley Bush" with it's soft branches of greenary. Once I was told it was so soft you could substitute it for toilet paper if you ran out. I never did, so I cannot confirm if that's true.
  • Wooden boards buried in the sand make a different surface to walk on.
    Wooden boards buried in the sand make a different surface to walk on.
  • Granite rocks have definately been replaced by limestone around here. The green below shows a fresh water spring is active.
    Granite rocks have definately been replaced by limestone around here. The green below shows a fresh water spring is active.
  • Walking around this limestone rock clump, I head up the hill to the distant bare sandy summit.
    Walking around this limestone rock clump, I head up the hill to the distant bare sandy summit.
  • Duckboards stop the local vegetation from being damaged. I
    Duckboards stop the local vegetation from being damaged. I must be coming to a tourist area where there are more people walking and sight seeing.
  • My trusty Black Daimond extendible walking pole takes a well earnt break. My left leg had been in serious pain for 100's of kilometres
    My trusty "Black Diamond" extendible walking pole takes a well earnt break. My left leg had been in serious pain for 100's of kilometres, even thought the pole was reducing the amount of weight on it. So close that I felt I would have crawled rather than give up now. Later found I had damaged a nerve in my spine (pinched nerve).




  • The sun reflects off the Shingleback Lizards scales.
    The sun reflects off the "Shingleback Lizard's" scales, as it eyes me cautiously. It eventaully threatened me by opening it's mouth wide, so I backed off.
  • Irwin Inlet. Now all I have to do is follow the Inlet down through the bush, rather than along the beach
    "Irwin Inlet". Now all I have to do is follow the Inlet down through the bush, rather than along the beach, to a narrow point in the distance, where ther are some canoes located in a shed. There I can cross and stay dry.
  • Looking out to sea from the entrance of Irwin Inlet
    Looking out to sea from the entrance of "Irwin Inlet"
  • Irwin Inlet showing more of the river exiting into the ocean. Very scenic.
    "Irwin Inlet" showing more of the river exiting into the ocean. Very scenic.
  • With my zoom camera I can see in the distance where I will be crossing - where the two points of land with vegetation are closest.
    With my zoom camera I can see in the distance where I will be crossing - where the two points of land with vegetation are closest. t is very wide behind that point, so it cannot be there. This is a real landmark of the journey - canoeing across the river.
  • Steps, steps and more steps, as I walk down Irwin Inlet thrrough the bush. I had not realised it was so hilly and these steps are so uneven in height
    Steps, steps and more steps, as I walk beside "Irwin Inlet" through the bush. I had not realised it was so hilly and these steps are so uneven in height. Some are just huge and required a lot of effort with my backpack getting me off balance.
  • Finally I come out of the darker bush setting, into the glare of the Inlet waters, but I can see canoes so I am happy.
    Finally I come out of the darker bush setting, into the glare of the Inlet waters, but I can see canoes so I am happy. Now this "Bibbulmun Track" marker makes sense, more than the previous one pointing over the ocean.
  • Double click on this picture and you like me, can read the instructions.
    Double click on this picture and you like me, can read the instructions. It is really worthwhlile reading all the destructions. I did not want to end my journey in the middle of the water, by loosing my backpack.
  • The canoes are in good condition and used frequently at this time of the year.
    The canoes are in good condition and used frequently at this time of the year. That's presumably why they are not in the shed?
  • With my backpack in the front compartment so I can keep an eye on it, I sit down and take my first water crossing of three.
    With my backpack in the front compartment so I can keep an eye on it, I sit down and take my first water crossing of three. I can see the canoe shed on the other side that I am heading for.
  • Nearing the southern bank after ferry gliding across the windy inlet
    Nearing the southern bank after "ferry gliding" across the windy inlet. I learnt to canoe at school plus I have completed an "Avon Descent" in a single canoe, but these are more like "Canadian "dugouts.
  • I forgot to drain all the water out of the canoe - just the majority of it
    I forgot to drain all the water out of the canoe - just majority of it: so my backpack got slightly sodden while sitting on the canoe floor.
  • Now for the journey back to the northern side or first shed, towing a spare canoe behind me.
    Now for the journey back to the northern side or first shed, towing a spare canoe behind me. Not easy taking pictures, at the same time as you are being blown downstream!
  • Terra firma - well sort of as it is quite muddy.
    Terra firma - well sort of as it is quite muddy. Once I had decided where I was going to beach the canoe, I just paddled quickly to push myself up on the shore. Probably would have been better with my boots off, but that takes time to complete.
  • I really enjoyed the canoe crossing.
    I really enjoyed the canoe crossing, although it chews up lots of time as you cannot rush it.
  • I arrived to take several shots, until off-loading my backpack and going back again, with a paddle, life jacket and spare canoe
    I arrived to take several shots, until off-loading my backpack and going back again, with a paddle, life jacket and spare canoe. If I had been half an hour later, I could have handed everything over to a German hiker going south to north.
  • Here you see the two canoes teathered together, as you cannot use one without taking one back.
    Here you see the two canoes teathered together, as you cannot use one without taking one back.
  • The Showgrounds is strange place, where there are open heath areas with grassland vegetation in many different small valleys
    The "Showgrounds" is strange place, where there are open heath areas with grassland vegetation in many different small valleys. Not created or cleared my humans either. Shadeless on a hot day with quite a few sandy hills to climb too.
  • Nobody seems to know the answer as to why trees and bushes don't grow on the
    Nobody seems to know the answer as to why trees and bushes don't grow on the "Showgrounds" valleys.
  • Navigating down this one to two metre cut-through in the Track was not easy with a heavy backpack.
    Navigating down this one to two metre cut-through in the Track was not easy with a heavy backpack. The flies were enjoying all my sweat droplets on my face. My shadow on the left.
  • The Track is not easy to follow in front of me, but I can see where it ends up on the hilll in the distance.
    The Track is not easy to follow in front of me, but I can see where it ends up on the hilll in the distance.
  • Dead tree with so much green around it.
    Dead tree with so much green around it. I believe that the water course dried up under it's roots.
  • Parry Beach looking back as I remember that the weather suddenly turned into a full storn on Mazzoletti Beach.
    "Parry Beach" looking back as I remember that the weather suddenly turned into a full storn on "Mazzoletti Beach". I was blown down the length of it by a 25 knot wind, stinging rain and very poor visability. The "Parry Inlet" channel was fortunately easily crossed.
  • Trying to find hard wet sand is not easy when beach walking, but it cetainly was good to take the boots off and air the feet.
    Trying to find hard wet sand is not easy when beach walking, but it cetainly was good to take the boots off and air the feet. Beach walking was enjoyable, as I did not have to look out for snakes or anything to trip over.
  • This is one exit off the beach you could only miss, in blinding rain and poor visability.
    This is one exit off the beach you could only miss, in blinding rain and poor visability.
  • A fantastic use for old tyres, chained together to provide steps up a sand dune.
    A fantastic use for old tyres, chained together to provide steps up a sand dune.
  • Although I was a lone walker, I would quite often recognise the same boot prints, going in the same direction, of a hiker one or two days in front.
    Although I was a lone walker, I would quite often recognise the same boot prints, going in the same direction, of a hiker one or two days in front. These are my "Croc" shoe prints, having walked as far as the eye can see.
  • This is the local 4 wheel drive club campsite. by the ocean.
    This is the local four wheel drive club campsite. by the ocean. Not a "Bibbulmun Track" sign. It is a very exposed campsite, but I suppose you shelter behind your vehicle.
  • When walking on the beach in the rain, I went to go and investigate something swept up by the surf.
    When walking on the beach in the rain, I went to go and investigate something swept up by the surf. After checking it was nothing of importance, I stopped to read my map to make sure I had not missed my sand dune turn-off iwith the poor visability. Next moment a large wave swamped my boots I had on, and soaked me up to my knees. I could only stand and laiugh, as the rest of me was very wet too. I did NOT pay attention to the ocean and paid a small price.
  • Now I knew why I had trained onthe steep Jacobs ladder steps in Kings Park. These were tougher only becasue of the soft sand surface.
    Now I knew why I had trained on the steep "Jacobs Ladder" steps in "Kings Park Perth". These were tougher only becasue of the soft sand surface.
  • This pic only shows half of the steps looking back down.
    This picture only shows half of the steps looking back down. I would not have liked the job of building them. The sand and the constant steps were the main reasons why the southern section of Track was not my favourite, in comparison with the middle section.
  • The sandy beaches turn into granite shelves on this section.
    The sandy beaches turn into granite shelves on this section, which the waves really pound.
  • Looking east along the coast from near Boat Harbour.
    Looking east along the coast from near "Boat Harbour".
  • So close and yet so far from the Boat Harbour campsite. I had run out of drinking water and I really wanted to walk in a straight line to the rainwater tank.
    So close and yet so far from the "Boat Harbour" campsite. I had run out of drinking water and I really wanted to walk in a straight line to the rainwater tank. Instead the road went in a huge loop, tme further away, before coming back to the hut. This was the only time I mis-managed my water, by taking 1.5 litres in my 3 litre water bag. I was trying to reduce weight by 1 kilo, but sufered a very dry mouth instead.
  • Mosquito net in place suspended from the ceiling.
    Mosquito net in place suspended from the ceiling. I soaked it in "Pyretherine" before I left home, so that any mosquitos getting in when I got in, died the moment they landed on the surface. Handy for fly protection too. Never had any beasts raiding my food, as it was always hung up in my backpack. Sometimes I would wrap my silver foil space blanket around the outside, so that I could hear any Possums tampering with it in the night.
  • This hut is also a nesting place for migrating swallows with their mud nests.
    This hut is also a nesting place for migrating swallows with their mud nests.
  • At times I was very tidy and slept in a small footprint, even though I was the only one in the shelter.
    At times I was very tidy and slept in a small footprint, even though I was the only one in the shelter.
  • As soon as I arrived in a hut, I undid both my down sleeping bag and my air matress, so they could both re-inflate, after squeezing all the air out for traveling.
    As soon as I arrived in a hut, I undid both my down sleeping bag and my air matress, so they could both re-inflate, after squeezing all the air out for traveling.
  • The pale grey area around my sleeping bag neck was a heat baffle.
    The pale grey area around my sleeping bag neck was a heat baffle. Pull the cord and hot air could not get out as you turned over. Found I could sleep without a beanie because of the built in hood. Only wished it had a full length zip to let some more cool air i! Basically it was too hot, except on two nights of 2 and 4C. The wood chip floor fo the huts in the south, was much better than the dusty dry dirt (dirty) floors in the northern huts.
  • Here you can see the diametres of the sleeping bag (yellow) and the (orange) Thermarest full length mattress weighing 680gms.
    Here you can see the diametres of the sleeping bag (yellow) and the (orange) "Thermarest" full length mattress weighing 680gms. Both had their own waterproof bags. Inside the pack I had a 70 litre -98gm "Ultra-Sil" pack liner, with special double top closure, so that no water ever got in at all (highly recommended). A belt and braces approach.
  • On the right side is my self-inflating ProLite 4 very ligh and most compact mattress, with a long webbing strap and pull pressure buckle keeping it together.
    On the right side is my self-inflating "ProLite 4" very ligh and most compact mattress, with a long webbing strap and pull pressure buckle keeping it together. The yellow compression bag on the left is for my small waterproof, too warm sleeping bag - it only weighed 800gms and went down to -5C. I was determined to get a warm nights sleep and I sure did!
  • The blue wetsuit material beside m Croc shoes was half of my head diving gear, that I cut up into two large sections for extra padding to slip under my backpack straps or arouund the hips - (highly recommened).
    The blue wetsuit material beside my "Croc" shoes was half of my head diving gear, that I cut up into two large sections for extra padding to slip under my backpack straps or arouund the hips - (highly recommened). It was also good for sitting on wet logs and had many uses. I lost one in" Denmark" climbing cliffs (when doing a slight flood detour and was not willing to go back and search for it.
  • Whle munching on breakfast I didn't waste time, but instead put on my Gaiters, using velcro tape to do up the front.
    While munching on breakfast I didn't waste time, but instead put on my gaiters, using velcro tape to do up the front. The cord under the boot arch never broke, although I was warned that it would. Once I did that underside knot up, it stayed like that for the rest of the journey. I would just slip them over my boots.
  • I get the feeling I am being watched by this friendly little Welcome Swallow
    I get the feeling I am being watched by this friendly little "Welcome Swallow", that is covering a sleeping area below with droppings. Good company though.
  • This Welcome Swallow looks much like the Barn Swallow that migrates all over the world.
    This "Welcome Swallow" looks much like the "Barn Swallow" that migrates all over the world. The swallow above can be found all over "Australasia".
  • Back on the Track again, heading out of Williams Bay campsite with still no trees in sight.
    Back on the Track again, heading out of "Williams Bay" campsite with still no trees in sight. I am still on these vegetated sand dunes with the ocean and wind for company. - strong gusts and occasional showers.

  • Bright white beach sand below.
    Bright white beach sand below.
  • I feel like a four wheel drive vehicle, but only on one track. Now this rubber surface makes walking so much easier on sand.
    I feel like a four wheel drive vehicle, but only on one track. Now this rubber surface makes walking so much easier on sand.
  • My first distant shot of Albany Wind Farm with the zoom. Little did I know how close I could get to these almost silent sentries.
    My first distant shot of "Albany Wind Farm" with the zoom. Little did I know how close I could get to these almost silent sentries.
  • I enjoyed the seven kilometre beach walk crossing the mouth of Torbay Inlet. I knew the hardest parts of my epic journey were over.
    I enjoyed the seven kilometre beach walk crossing the mouth of "Torbay Inlet". I knew the hardest parts of my epic journey were over. The locals even fed me some spare quiche and salad, the also strawberries from their picnic hamper. What a beautiful welcome to Albany.
  • This channel was flowing, but it was not the main one on Torbay Beach. Crossing it with boots off was not a problem.
    This channel was flowing, but it was not the main one on "Torbay Beach". Crossing it with boots off was not a problem.
  • The channel across the beach had the usual Tanin brown or brackish water.
    The channel across the beach had the usual Tanin brown or brackish water.
  • This fast action shot shows how the water was quicklly widening the channel, as sections of beach sand collapsed into the water, as I took the pic.
    This fast action shot shows how the water was quicklly widening the channel, as sections of beach sand collapsed into the water, as I took the picture. Double click for a close-up and then click again to see more detail.
  • Torbay Inlet was blocked by a sandbar, so no wading was required.
    "Torbay Inlet" was blocked by a sandbar, so no wading was required.
  • Mutton Bird viewing platform where I was given a picnic lunch by some locals, who had watched me walking the length of the beach. Fishermen below.
    "Mutton Bird" viewing platform where I was given a picnic lunch by some locals, who had watched me walking the length of the beach. Fishermen below.
  • The view back up the beach I had just walked along. As usual very soft fine sand.
    The view back up the beach I had just walked along. As usual very soft fine sand.
  • Happy to oblige as I don't plan to end the journey here!
    Happy to oblige as I don't plan to end the journey here!
  • As I approached Hidden Valley campsite the Albany Wind Farm got closer.
    As I approached "Hidden Valley" campsite the "Albany Wind Farm" got closer.
  • Suddenly noticed that my leg muscles had grown with all the exercise.
    Suddenly noticed that my leg muscles had grown with all the exercise.
  • Around 1001 kilometres of walking had cost or lost me around 10 kgs, and I was not fat to start off with!!
    Around 1001 kilometres of walking had cost or lost me around 10 kgs, and I was not fat to start off with!!
  • The very last shelter or hut at Hidden Valley. I uderstand other walkers saying that the just wanted to turn around and keep walking.
    The very last shelter or hut at "Hidden Valley". I understand other walkers saying that the just wanted to turn around and keep walking. It becomes a way of life, with it's little routines and state of mind. I never knew what was around the next corner, so every experience was new and thought provoking. Could I live back in the Big SMoke again?
  • Sun up over the Wind Farm in Albany.
    Sun up over the "Wind Farm" in "Albany".
  • The towers look like they are climbing the hill, as you walk by Albany Wind Farm.
    The towers look like they are climbing the hill, as you walk by "Albany Wind Farm".
  • My first Track view of the finishing town Albany
    My first Track view of the finishing town "Albany"
  • You can see by the spray from the surf that this is a windy spot.
    You can see by the spray from the surf that this is a windy spot. The turbine blades were rotating, but suprised me by their quietness.
  • At times I felt the Track was going to pass underneath the columns.
    At times I felt the Track was going to pass underneath the columns. No mud, water or bushes on this tourist section of the Track.
  • This raised boardwalk show how close you get to Albany Wind Farm.
    This raised boardwalk show how close you get to "Albany Wind Farm".
  • The signage with the Wind Farm as a back-drop.
    The signage with the "Wind Farm" as a back-drop.
  • It was difficult to comprehend before the walk and just as difficult after completing it, that it was nearly 1,000kms! While walkig, I did not focus on the magnitude, but on each day as it unfolded.
    It was difficult to comprehend before the walk and just as difficult after completing it, that it was nearly 1,000kms! While walkig, I did not focus on the magnitude, but on each day as it unfolded.
  • I did not want to miss having at least one good shot of this sign, as there were few of them on the Track giving the distance involved.
    I did not want to miss having at least one good shot of this sign, as there were few of them on the Track giving the distance involved. Even in a closs-up, the flowers got in the picture.
  • Another sign telling me the Terminus or finshing spot was only 15kms away.
    Another sign telling me the "Terminus" or finshing spot was only 15kms away.
  • Sandpatch Cliffs viewing platform and the Bib Track sign tells me that it is nearly all over on the 51st day.
    "Sandpatch Cliffs" viewing platform and the "Bibbulmun Track" sign tells me that it is nearly all over on the 51st day.
  • No this is not a four wheel vehicle track, just the wide trekking Track to protect the sand hill from erosion. It sure makes life easier and was much appreciated.
    No this is not a four wheel vehicle track, just the wide trekking Track to protect the sand hill from erosion. It sure makes life easier and was much appreciated.
  • Lacking a walking partner, my backpack tended to feature in many of my shots.
    Lacking a walking partner, my backpack tended to feature in many of my shots. If it could have done it would have been smiling like the owneer, as I crusied along towards the finish. On close-up (double click the picture) you will notice my suntan cream that I carried the whole way in outside pocket, yet only applied three or four times. The mosquito roll-on was used more often.
  • The waterproof and windproof jacket needs to be positioned somewhere where you can reach it quickly.
    The waterproof and windproof jacket needs to be positioned somewhere where you can reach it quickly. Stuffing it through the loop at the back of the pack for hanging it up, was an ideal solution. It only once worked loose, but I spotted it before it totally fell. It would have been a disaster to loose!
  • If I had walked without any pole or walking stick, I would have had to substitute something else to do a million jobs.
    If I had walked without any pole or walking stick, I would have had to substitute something else to do a million jobs. Here the stick is helping balance the backpack in the wind: like the rubber wetsuit layer under the pack, making the base more level. Everything had a use or a place.
  • If I had walked without any pole or walking stick, I would have had to substitute something else to do a million jobs.
    If I had walked without any pole or walking stick, I would have had to substitute something else to do a million jobs.
  • A quick zoom shot in the morning haze, of Albany houses from across the bay.
    A quick zoom shot in the morning haze, of 'Albany" houses from across the bay.
  • Just when Tiger snakes were the last thing on my mind, this two metre one decides it's not camera shy.
    Just when "Tiger" snakes were the last thing on my mind, this two metre one decides it's not camera shy. It moved very quckly off the Track in the hot morning sun, as I got closer. For once I get the first of two shots after seeing 50 "Tigers" and 4 "Dugite" snakes, spotted lying on the Track in front of me. It was just a matter of having the camera set up and ready.
  • I started the journey afraid of snakes and finished it admiring the Tiger snakes beautiful yellow and green underbelly and black back.
    I started the journey afraid of snakes and finished it admiring the "Tiger" snakes beautiful yellow and green underbelly and black back. I heard at least another 50 snakes beside the Track going away through the bushes, but they were never a problem for me. The triple frog population also tripled the snakes too. All because of a very wet spring. I learnt not to walk on the sunny side of the Track, as the shady side had less snakes sunbathing!
  • Cultivated town flowers grow in large bush clumps, almost looking like wildflowers.
    Cultivated town flowers grow in large bush clumps, almost looking like wildflowers.
  • Albany Town Hall was a personal goal to reach, having placed a picture of it hanging in my study, ever since I decided to walk to Albany.
    Albany Town Hall was a personal goal to reach, having placed a picture of it hanging in my study, ever since I decided to walk to Albany. This photograph was taken as I walked back up the hill, looking for a hotel that served reasonably priced steaks and draught Guinness on tap for lunch.
  • An emotional moment as my camera tripod balances onmy backpack for this finishing shot. Five months of training and 51 days on the Track and I had arrived.
    An emotional moment as my camera tripod balances on my backpack for this finishing shot. Five months of training and 51 days on the Track and I had arrived.
  • Back to cvilization, hot showers, non-dehydrated food and no more walking. It took more than a day to come back to Earth.
    Back to cvilization, hot showers, non-dehydrated food and no more walking. It took more than a day to come back to "Earth". I stayed in "Albany" for two nights before catching a coach back through "Denmark" to "Bunbury", then caught the "Australind" train back to "Perth". Lots of leg room on the train and good to get off the road and away from traffic.

Looking back to the roof of my last hut. A blurred shot, but it shows the isolation of the hut.